A VISION FOR CLINTON HIGH SCHOOL

The Clinton Community School District has hired FRK architects to do a feasibility study of the current condition of Clinton High School.  This study has been completed and the following are the conclusions:

  • The lower part of the academic building was built in 1919 and was not replaced in the 1968 fire.  Therefore much of the structure (and infrastructure—piping, electrical, plumbing, etc.) is 100 years old.  This building has little to no insulation in the external masonry walls, no fire area separation, and no sprinkler system.  The HVAC, mechanical, and electrical systems are 50 years or older, beyond their useful life expectancy.
  • The “shops” building was constructed in 1958.  The roof of this building needs to be replaced.  Much of the flooring is original.  Like the 1919 building, there is no fire separation and it lacks a sprinkler system.  There are also some issues about meeting all ADA standards in the stairways.  The 1958 building has multiple locations of materials that contain asbestos.  The parking lot in this area is steep and not ideal.
  • The 1969 building is the part of the campus that replaced the space damaged in the 1968 fire.  It has little to no insulation and the majority of the roof needs to be replaced.  The 1969 building has no fire separation and does not have a sprinkler system, except in the auditorium.  This building has multiple issues of accessibility.  Materials that contain asbestos exist in this building, as well.  The main entrance is not close to current parking lots on district property.
  • The original 1958 Yourd Gymnasium was extensively remodeled in 2011.  However, it still has little to no insulation in the exterior masonry walls.  Existing upper level exterior windows are original and have little to no R value.  The concourse level of Yourd has had little to no updating since it was built.

This spring, the district will begin the conversation with the community about the best plan to renovate Clinton High School to serve its students for the next 50 years.  There will be several options to consider as we look to the future.

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